My Review of ‘The Postman Always Rings Twice’ (1946)

ThePostmanAlwaysRingsTwice

Okay, so John Garfield (playing a drifter named Frank Chambers) hitches a ride to the middle of nowhere, except there’s a diner there. Well, I guess he was hungry, because he leaves his ride and stops inside for a hamburger.

Postman-Working

Which he actually makes himself, while the owner (a guy named Nick Smith, played by Cecil Kellaway) is out of the room. And while Nick is out and about, well … in comes Lana Turner (playing the “I’m-not-bad-just-drawn-that-way” blonde wife, Cora).

LanaTurner

Needless to say, Frank goes gaga over Cora. His hamburger burns, but he doesn’t care. And when clueless, carefree hubby, Nick, offers him a job at the joint, he takes it. Can’t imagine why.

You can almost read Frank’s thoughts. Enough drifting! There’s a hot blonde with pert tatas and legs up to her neck hidden in this godforsaken rathole!

So time goes by, business sucks, and hubby dearest decides it’s time to sell the diner. This does not sit well with Cora, who becomes even less enchanted when hubby tells her they’re moving to Canada. To the middle of nowhere in Canada. To his crippled mother’s home in the middle of nowhere in Canada. And Cora can spend her days playing wet nurse to Mom.

Postman-Trip

Do I really need to spell out the upcoming scenario? Of course, Blondie conspires with former drifter-hamburger flipper Frank to bump off the annoying hubby. Why? Because getting a divorce and settling for halfsies would suck so bad.

Postman-Lana&John

And after the deed is done, they live happily ever after. Not! This is a film noir, not a Disney movie.

Postman-The End

Now, I won’t say more for risk of revealing spoilers. Let’s just say that what comes around goes around. And it doesn’t help that the justice system is just a teeny bit corrupt.

Postman-End2

I’ll be honest. I like this film, but I’ve never been crazy about the ending.

However, the movie is still a great example of film noir. So, I’m giving it one thumb up! 🙂

One-Thumb-Up

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